The fight for equality by minority groups has been recorded in history for thousands of years. Art has been and is a valuable vehicle to express the struggle of these minorities, and it is through this art -in large part- that the rest of society has been able, to see, listen and empathize with these groups. The expression of feelings of oppression, of the fight, of the anger, of the sadness, have allowed the advancement of these minorities in their struggle to find their place and their freedom. Few things are as important to a human being as being seen, with the space to be who we are – as we are- without fear.

We have had the fortune to witness in our lifetime how the LGBTTTIQA community has earned its place in society. This place of equality is increasingly tangible, but the fight continues as there is still enormous discrimination. There are countries where being homosexual is still a crime. Even in much more tolerant countries, internalized homophobia remains a source of fear, inhibiting people to express themselves freely. This is where art – particularly – continues to be our ally, helping us to see what we often ignore – even if we consider ourselves tolerant and inclusive.

The celebration of Gay Pride will be limited this year by the COVID-19 pandemic, but let us celebrate from home that today, the LGBTTTIQA community is “seen” more than ever before. Let us celebrate so that the oppressed of the world may feel acknowledged, respected and NOT alone. Let’s express our solidarity to inspire those who need it most. Let us take the opportunity to appreciate the expression of this movement in all of its forms, expanding our collective consciousness and moving towards a more tolerant, more inclusive, more empathetic and more united world.